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Jane Doe

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John White

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Lisa Heart
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[vc_column_text]This program was created based on parental requests. Originally designed for Kindergarteners, it was later expanded to include first graders. The games played in this sequence are designed to promote linear mathematical concepts, working memory, processing speed and enhance perceptual organization. Students learn how to classify an object into more than one category or into one category based on two or more simultaneous properties. Games played in this module localize predominantly the frontal lobes and the parietal cortex in the brain.[/vc_column_text]
[vc_column_text]These modules introduce the circular curriculum and cover age-appropriate games of ancient and abstract strategy, classic and modern card games, word games, sport games and empire and civilization building games.[/vc_column_text]
[vc_column_text]There are a wide-variety of RPGs but, most of them at some basic level, require interpersonal interaction and, to a large degree, cooperation. It is also fair to say that cooperative social interaction is critical for human social development and learning. With this in mind, it is interesting to consider that these classes, now the most popular of all classes, were prompted by student requests and were originally not part of the game module sequence. The brain regions involved in playing RPGs affect the focal regions associated with social cognition, attention, and reward processing. In particular, these are the superior temporal sulcus, the anterior singulate cortex, the right cuneus/lingual gyrus and the right amygdala.[/vc_column_text]
[vc_column_text]Tabletop games is a general term for just about any game played on a table. More recently, this concept refers more specifically to games that are played with some form of miniature (or model), dice, measuring tape, complex rules and strategy. These type of hobby-games range from historical to fantasy-based combat. Students that engage in these programs utilize skills that reflect cognitive flexibility, working memory, response and spatial orientation. They also draw specific attention to mathematical skills such as measuring distance and basic trigonometry. The focal brain regions involved in these games are similar to the activation seen in RPGs and, in particular, the superior temporal sulcus, anterior singulate cortex, ventral striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (e.g., typically involved in risk-reward decisions).[/vc_column_text]
[vc_column_text]We support special programs for “the most beautiful game”, offering private lessons and tutoring upon special request, along with beginner intro class sessions and programs for more advanced students. As with other strategy games, chess requires concentration and memory- but also endurance and memorization to an extent greater than almost any other game.[/vc_column_text]
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